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Okay this blog post is not like the usual stuff you get from me — it will probably require patience and note-taking. It corresponds with a mini-series on the With Joe Wehbe Podcast to do with Nassim Nicholas Taleb, whose books are pretty hard to read especially for young people!   Check out the podcast here — the Taleb series starts from episode 181.   I want to spend time on the podcast unpacking great thinkers about education, learning and careers and I wanted to start with Taleb. Taleb is a very entertaining, intellectually sassy figure known in particular for his epic books and ideas

For 2017 I invested more than $10K to participate in private online communities (more than $15K if you include the associated travel and related expenses). For 2018 my investment has already exceeded $30K, and I’m looking to bump it to $40-50K within the next several months. — Steve Pavlina   Today I dissect a long-form, incredibly high quality blog post by Steve Pavlina from 2018 called 'The Rise of Private Communities' — for Pavlina, the investment he'd made into private communities was better than Bitcoin. Earlier this year Scott McKeon and I established a private community called The Constant Student, and I've

Should you start a podcast? As hard as it is to give generic, best-for-all advice, the answer is probably yes. There's not many things I can say that about, but a podcast is probably one of them.   I launched the With Joe Wehbe Podcast about 11 months ago. I made 121 daily episodes, then stopped for eight months, but now I'm excited to start publishing episodes again.   It's been a very unorthodox podcast journey, but one I'm proud of. Without major reach and distribution yet, so many positives have come from it. In that vein, the below are just 32 of the many

I never had a 'career freak out' at any stage of my life, so it's hard to empathise with others who do.   The closest I ever came was my time at uni and my time in real estate, where I knew I wasn't doing the most with my time, wasn't doing the thing that made me come alive — but I had a vague idea of what that other 'thing' was on both occasions.   When I was studying at uni, I knew I should have been doing more filmmaking.   When I was focused on real estate, I had a sense something that exposed

Tim Ferriss runs one of the world's best podcasts, is a bestselling author, and was ahead of his time when he published the 4 Hour Work Week.   He is one of few icons of mine.   I consulted his blog a few years ago for guidance about writing a book. What I found disheartened me, shattered me.   Don't write the book first

Most of us look for a map to follow. I suspect we have all been guilty of wanting to see the path laid out before us, with no hidden bends or unfinished roads.   But as it is with real-world expeditions, you need to go off road.   No great learning or solution can be laid out step-by-step-by-step. The Thousand Doors is the truth that your real future lies hidden, out of sight, and requires you to Open Doors.   There is no fool-proof process, no journey free from obstacles. If you're being creative and daring, there are very few relevant best practices.   Nothing worthwhile is straightforward.   Stop

I've heard, from various sources, that online courses have anywhere between a 2-8% completion rate. Given my interest in education, learning, and online education, today I'm going to speculate as to why.   Here's four reasons to explore: Most of us are bad at coming back to things People realise it's not for them Inspiration is not sustainable. Often, people are not looking to learn.   1) Most of us are bad at coming back to things   Don't try to motivate yourself to go to an early morning gym session. Just get up and put your gym shorts on — then you'll find yourself triggering

"The only risk, is not taking any risks" - Scott McKeon   When you're in the Room choosing between a few Doors, there is only one option that is wrong. As each Door is really the first of a Thousand Doors that lie one after another, the only wrong decision is choosing no Door. The Door I'm opening now in my life is called The Constant Student Community. It is an online learning community to help people discover what they love doing — whether it's a traditional career, creative side project or full-blown startup. To be clear, this is a business I've co-founded and

How did Leonardo Da Vinci become a master of fields so diverse as anatomy, physics, dentistry, art, music, astronomy, engineering, and many, many more?   It's a question worth asking. If we can capture just a percentile of his brilliance, we can contribute and accomplish a lot in our lives.   Da Vinci made discoveries that were centuries ahead of his time, despite lacking a formal education. Some accounts of history suggest, however, that his brilliance might be because of the lack of formal education.   Circulation.   So let's start with something that he was surprisingly wrong about. That's weird to say isn't it? In Walter Isaacson's

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