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Most of us look for a map to follow. I suspect we have all been guilty of wanting to see the path laid out before us, with no hidden bends or unfinished roads.   But as it is with real-world expeditions, you need to go off road.   No great learning or solution can be laid out step-by-step-by-step. The Thousand Doors is the truth that your real future lies hidden, out of sight, and requires you to Open Doors.   There is no fool-proof process, no journey free from obstacles. If you're being creative and daring, there are very few relevant best practices.   Nothing worthwhile is straightforward.   Stop

I've heard, from various sources, that online courses have anywhere between a 2-8% completion rate. Given my interest in education, learning, and online education, today I'm going to speculate as to why.   Here's four reasons to explore: Most of us are bad at coming back to things People realise it's not for them Inspiration is not sustainable. Often, people are not looking to learn.   1) Most of us are bad at coming back to things   Don't try to motivate yourself to go to an early morning gym session. Just get up and put your gym shorts on — then you'll find yourself triggering

"The only risk, is not taking any risks" - Scott McKeon   When you're in the Room choosing between a few Doors, there is only one option that is wrong. As each Door is really the first of a Thousand Doors that lie one after another, the only wrong decision is choosing no Door. The Door I'm opening now in my life is called The Constant Student Community. It is an online learning community to help people discover what they love doing — whether it's a traditional career, creative side project or full-blown startup. To be clear, this is a business I've co-founded and

How did Leonardo Da Vinci become a master of fields so diverse as anatomy, physics, dentistry, art, music, astronomy, engineering, and many, many more?   It's a question worth asking. If we can capture just a percentile of his brilliance, we can contribute and accomplish a lot in our lives.   Da Vinci made discoveries that were centuries ahead of his time, despite lacking a formal education. Some accounts of history suggest, however, that his brilliance might be because of the lack of formal education.   Circulation.   So let's start with something that he was surprisingly wrong about. That's weird to say isn't it? In Walter Isaacson's

For years I've listened to the Tim Ferriss Show, and listened to business speakers discuss the importance of not taking just any customer. That focusing on the right customers is important as anything.   Whilst the message was in my ear, I never implemented it. That is, until I got a whole heap of problematic clients that drained all my time and energy. They wanted everything done when they said so, and they pestered me all the time.   Finally, I began cutting them. I learnt the lesson, because I earnt it, through pain and mistakes. Through experience, I l-earnt it.   I could sit down

The Most Interested Person Of All Time   There was once a man who, five hundred years ago, figured out that birds wings flap up at a different speed to which they flap down. But he was no zoologist.   He mapped out the dental structure of humans. But never practiced dentistry.   He devised an experiment with a bull's heart and wax to determine how blood flowed in the heart. But he never treated a patient.   He discovered friction, plus some of Newton's Laws two hundred years ahead of time, but didn't publish scientific findings at all.   He designed flying machines, crossbows, and other feats of engineering.

This is Warren Buffett and Charles T. Munger. If you've never seen or heard of them before, they're two of the most famous investors of all time, and their partnership has lasted 62 years. They were introduced at a dinner party by a mutual friend who thought they'd get along in 1959.   They form one of the most powerful partnerships of all time, and they show us the importance and impact that the right people can have on your life.   The Impact   I can't really comment on the impact Buffett has had on Munger, or vice versa. I'm not privy to their inner circles.

When I was in my late teens, I didn’t really understand that entrepreneurship could be a path for me. It just seemed like this thing Richard Branson (creator of Virgin) did. It didn’t seem accessible even though I read his book and learnt about his story.    I remember another moment when I was at university studying psychology. We did this unit on consumer psychology and I thought about how fascinating that would be as a career path, but I was in a bind. My dream had been, for however long, to be a filmmaker and not a psychologist.    I looked at these

Imagine your life one year from now.   You cannot be certain that you’ll have more money than you do now. Incomes rise and fall, markets change overnight, and you never know what is lurking around the corner. Your job can go, the banking system can collapse, and everything you’ve saved and worked hard for can be wiped away in an instant. And you may be sufficiently diversified. You may listen to Ray Dalio, you may have a few piles of gold, and your fat-bellied, horn-rimmed glasses-wearing financial advisor might tell you at your appointments that everything is in order. But even

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