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Alan Watts was a prolific philosopher, absolutely light years ahead of his time especially with the predictions he made about the education revolution before his death in 1973.   Philosophy is something that keeps popping up on this journey — those who dive into it seem to find the ability to really see things.   The episodes we did on Alan Watts on the With Joe Wehbe Podcast, (episodes #203-#211) are some of the most powerful episodes done to date, and go deep to unearth some tightly held assumptions we have about work and life.   Luke Smith, my high school friend and co-host of these

College can be good for learning about what’s been done before, but it can also discourage you from doing something new. Each of our fellows charts a unique course; together they have proven that young people can succeed by thinking for themselves instead of following a traditional track and competing on old career tracks. The hardest thing about being a young entrepreneur is that you haven’t met everyone you’ll need to know to make your venture succeed. We can help connect you — to investors, partners, prospective customers — in Silicon Valley and beyond.   Strike a chord? These quotes come from the

Peter Thiel is one of the Co-Founders of PayPal and a key member of the ‘PayPal Mafia’ who went to go on and dominate the startup world, creating companies like Youtube, Tesla, SpaceX, LinkedIN and many others.   He’s also the Co-Founder of Palantir, the first outside investor in Facebook and the author of Zero to One (2014). As we’ll discuss today and on the With Joe Wehbe Podcast, he’s also the creator of The Thiel Fellowship, which gives young people $100,000 to quit college for a year and go work on their ideas.   There are entrepreneurs and their are entrepreneurs

For 2017 I invested more than $10K to participate in private online communities (more than $15K if you include the associated travel and related expenses). For 2018 my investment has already exceeded $30K, and I’m looking to bump it to $40-50K within the next several months. — Steve Pavlina   Today I dissect a long-form, incredibly high quality blog post by Steve Pavlina from 2018 called 'The Rise of Private Communities' — for Pavlina, the investment he'd made into private communities was better than Bitcoin. Earlier this year Scott McKeon and I established a private community called The Constant Student, and I've

This comes as part of my ramblings and loose thoughts for my next book, which I'm "Writing in Public" first through blog posts.   I've decided to move these back to the website, and am experimenting with keeping my newsletter simpler.   The below follows this most recent post on that awkward creative phase when you 'just have ideas', don't follow through with anything, and riddle yourself with guilt. These people don't realise they're on a very natural and healthy journey towards creative brilliance. The post today is about the next phase of that journey.   If you want to stay up-to-date with what I share,

Should you start a podcast? As hard as it is to give generic, best-for-all advice, the answer is probably yes. There's not many things I can say that about, but a podcast is probably one of them.   I launched the With Joe Wehbe Podcast about 11 months ago. I made 121 daily episodes, then stopped for eight months, but now I'm excited to start publishing episodes again.   It's been a very unorthodox podcast journey, but one I'm proud of. Without major reach and distribution yet, so many positives have come from it. In that vein, the below are just 32 of the many

Conventional careers planning has a gaping-wide hole.   It can't educate you about the jobs that don't yet exist.   That is, conventional careers planning has a Thousand Doors problem — the most impactful jobs will be those jobs we don't know about just yet, that universities would not be able to do a course on given they do yet exist. We cannot predict exactly what they will be.   No one can give you the steps, because someone like you will have to do it for the first time. Thirty years ago, no one knew what the internet was, what social media was, what cryptocurrency

Indeed, why learn at all? We talk so much about education and all its associated problems, but we forget to ask what the very purpose of it is at all.   Do I go to university? Are we teaching the right things in schools? These are the questions that always get asked. But we might do what all great thinkers do, and think from first principles.   We might go to the core, and ask the question that really matters. Why learn at all?   There's a quote about Warren Buffett, by his right hand man Charlie Munger, how he was still improving in his 70's,

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