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There was once a hippy — who didn’t shave his armpits, didn’t shower, and lived out of caravan parks.   And one day a blue collar worker drove past the hippy and scoffed at him. ‘Freeloader’ the blue collar worker mumbled to himself.   ‘That hippy will never do an honest day’s work his whole life’ the blue collar worker said to himself. ‘How sad.’   The blue collar worker drove to do a job at the house of a white collar worker, an accountant. The accountant scoffed at the blue collar worker, saying to herself ‘this man has to work with his hands, he’ll never

The 9 Biggest Takeaways From 4 Hour Work Week   This corresponds to the With Joe Wehbe Podcast series unpacking Tim Ferriss’ ideas on learning, early career and life. His famous breakout book, The 4 Hour Work Week has shifted the way a generation think about work, retirement, business and life.   While it has its shortcomings in very specific respects — and Ferriss discusses this — it is a key resource for a lot of big dreamers out there. I was one of those people who really got permission to think differently thanks to this book. This post unpacks my big takeaways, and

This is the second post on Naval Ravikant after unpacking his ideas on learning and education. Today we move into his famous Tweet storm-turned-podcast series 'How to Get Rich (Without Getting Lucky)' which is also dissected over a series of episodes on the With Joe Wehbe Podcast.   This blog post corresponds to those episodes (circa #217-#226) and unpacks the ideas in written form. Enjoy!   Naval on the role of money   Naval’s Tweet-storm and podcast is called ‘How to Get Rich Without Getting Lucky’. He prefaces this — he thought it would be a controversial discussion but everyone was interested. We live in a

Okay this blog post is not like the usual stuff you get from me — it will probably require patience and note-taking. It corresponds with a mini-series on the With Joe Wehbe Podcast to do with Nassim Nicholas Taleb, whose books are pretty hard to read especially for young people!   Check out the podcast here — the Taleb series starts from episode 181.   I want to spend time on the podcast unpacking great thinkers about education, learning and careers and I wanted to start with Taleb. Taleb is a very entertaining, intellectually sassy figure known in particular for his epic books and ideas

Galileo Galilei spent the end of his life under house arrest, after violating the belief system of his time.   The Roman Catholic Church imprisoned him as retribution for his scientific findings of heliocentrism — that the earth revolved around the sun.   It defied what people at the time believed.   I write of The Eiffel Tower Principle — the historic landmark also faced kickback and criticism from the French community who couldn't forsee what a wonderful gift it would be. I use this example to break down how and why people resist innovation at first.   It took Einstein years to have his ideas adopted. In

Stacking the upside is a principle that has been central to my life for the last four to five years. The 'upside' is what you stand to gain in a situation — stacking it means piling up what you will gain.   I'll give you examples below from my own personal business, learning, education and career journeys. The next examples are just to ensure that the basics are clear.   If you were going to choose between two properties to buy as an investment, one which is expected to grow in value at 5% per year, and another at 10%, the one with 10%

This comes as part of my ramblings and loose thoughts for my next book, which I'm "Writing in Public" first through blog posts.   I've decided to move these back to the website, and am experimenting with keeping my newsletter simpler.   The below follows this most recent post on that awkward creative phase when you 'just have ideas', don't follow through with anything, and riddle yourself with guilt. These people don't realise they're on a very natural and healthy journey towards creative brilliance. The post today is about the next phase of that journey.   If you want to stay up-to-date with what I share,

Should you start a podcast? As hard as it is to give generic, best-for-all advice, the answer is probably yes. There's not many things I can say that about, but a podcast is probably one of them.   I launched the With Joe Wehbe Podcast about 11 months ago. I made 121 daily episodes, then stopped for eight months, but now I'm excited to start publishing episodes again.   It's been a very unorthodox podcast journey, but one I'm proud of. Without major reach and distribution yet, so many positives have come from it. In that vein, the below are just 32 of the many

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